The Nature of Fika We at Fjällräven embrace our Swedish culture of fika, the tradition of an invitation to take part in a ritual cup of coffee paired with a sweet treat is an integral part of our everyday ethos. To us a coffee break is more than a quick cup of “joe”, to go. Instead, it’s a time for us to enjoy the taste, the smell and the time spent with our hands around a warm robust cup of coffee. We love this all!
hand holding coffee in front of lake
In Sweden,
fika (pronounced fee-ka) is an attitude, a tradition and an important twice-a day ritual. Historically, the word is slang and derived from “kaffi,” a 19th century word for coffee. Although, it can be compared to a simple break or get-together, fika is less about the coffee and more centered around the notion of time that is filled with indulgence. To experience this traditionally is to have a moment to slow down, (sometimes by candle-light) and nourish that part of us that appreciates the good things; noses fill with the essence of saffron and cardamom while pallets take pleasure in eating sweet food like warm cinnamon buns, sweet breads, fruits or soft sugary cakes all the while sipping boiled coffee or espresso out of our favorite porcelain cup.

This Swedish ritual doesn't diminish when we are spending time with nature. Most Swedes pack coffee in daypacks or for longer hikes. In fact, we believe there is no better time to enjoy coffee than with nature.

We reached out to a few members of our Fjällräven Fox family to share their favorite ways of Fika-ing while enjoying the nature around them
 

Makena Baker Headshot
Makena Barker Store Manager: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Backcountry Coffee of Choice - Instant Coffee

"The idea behind instant coffee is that it gets us up and out of camp quickly so we can make the most out of our day. A recent memory of coffee and the outdoors was this past October when we were in Moab. We stayed on East coast time so we were waking up in time to catch the sunrise each day. We brewed some coffee and hit the trail to catch the sunrise at Delicate Arch in Arches National Park. The desert was uncharacteristically cold so I found myself layered in every Fjallraven jacket I brought and enjoying the immediate warmth from the coffee. It’s really wonderful to find the kind of solitude that we did in a National Park these days."

For instant coffee that's still excellent quality, taste great and ready for adventure, check out our friends at Alpine Start! https://alpinestartfoods.com/pages/about-our-coffee


Favian Saenz Headshot
Favian Saenz Store Manager: Castle Rock, Colorado
Backcountry Coffee of Choice - Cowboy Coffee

Wait, what is Cowboy Coffee?


It is thought to be an outdated method of making coffee partly due to the history behind its origin. To keep it short, Cowboy Coffee is said to have come about during the westward expansion era, thus the name. Some misconceptions behind this method is that it is too thick, too acidic or too burnt tasting. However, when made correctly, it is as smooth as what you might expect from your local artisanal coffee shop.
 
What you need:
  • A kettle or bail
  • Water
  • Your favorite coffee
  • A spoon
  • Your favorite cup
  • Fire! 

Coffee Tools Laid Out

How to make it:
Step 1: Grab your kettle or bail and fill it with water.

Step 2: Start your fire and build up enough heat to get your water to a rolling boil. (Always adhere to fire restrictions in the area you are camping)

Step 3: Place your desired amount of coffee into the kettle or bail to boil. You can also place the coffee into the container after the water has come to a boil and been removed from the fire. However, if you want to remove the acidity from the taste of your coffee, boil it along with the water. The longer you boil, the smoother and less acidic it will taste.

Step 4: Remove your container from the fire and allow it to sit for 5-10 minutes.

Step 5: The fun part, but use please caution! Pick up your bail or kettle, ensure there is ample space around you (3 feet in all directions). With speed, rotate your container in circles over your head in a spinning motion as if you were doing arm circles. As fast as you started the rotation, stop with the same speed to avoid spilling your coffee. Conduct this motion for about a minute to ensure that the inertia aids in bringing as much coffee grounds to the bottom of the container as possible.

Step 6: Allow the container to sit for about five minutes after spinning to allow any final coffee grounds that may still be floating at the top to settle. Lastly grab your favorite cup, pour and enjoy!


Jon Hildreth Headshot
Jon Hildreth Field Marketing Representative
Backcountry Coffee Choice - Pour Over
 
"I've tried many different methods of coffee making while camping, but my favorite is the Pour Over."
  • Fulfills my love of the coffee ritual.
  • With just one cup at a time, it helps me from making too much coffee to finish and wasting.
  • Easy clean up. It makes packing out and composting very easy!
  • The pour over can be attached to any point on your backpack if room on inside is getting tight.
  • You can use the same camping stove for eating to heat your water!
  • Makes a great cup of coffee!


Key Tips for the Pour Over or the French Press method
  • Medium Ground
  • 0.75 ounces or 21 grams to a cup (about 4 tablespoons!)
  • 198-205* Fahrenheit is the best temperature for water (around 20 seconds off a boil!)
  • Pour water all over the coffee to get it saturated (this is the blooming time that creates a flavor party!)
  • Wait 45 seconds, then start pouring the water in a circular motion.
  • Pour about half the water. Let it filter through. Then pour the remaining water.

backpack with pour over coffee maker attached

We hope that you enjoy your next cup of coffee, whether you're waking up in your campsite out in the backcountry or inside your home sipping and dreaming about your next adventure out into nature!

woman holding coffee mug in the morning light

Tag us on Instagram of how you like to enjoy fika.

Man and Woman walking away from camera towards lake
During these times of uncertainty, we like to share ways for you and our community to stay connected to nature anytime and anywhere to prepare, comfort and inspire.
Nature Is Waiting